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Authenticating with identd using inetd or xinetd

There has been a lot of to-do about ident and IRC lately. A lot of IRC networks and/or channels require a working identd before you can connect/join. I'm going to step you through the requirements for getting ident running both with inetd and the newer xinetd. If you are running any of the older distributions, you are likely using inetd and have a file called /etc/inetd.conf . If you are using a newer distro i.e. redhat 7.0 or mandrake 7.0 or above, then you are likely using xinetd, which uses a directory called /etc/xinetd.d

Before we get started with the meat of this tutorial, let's understand why ident bans on IRC are a necessary evil, and why you, therefore, must run it. Most legitimate users of IRC use a client to connect to the IRC server that either provides an ident reply of its own, or relies upon an ident daemon to provide the necessary reply. Many of the people who abuse the internet do so with programs that do not provide the necessary ident reply since an actual reply would tell more about their true identity (Get it? IDENTity?). We do not wish to lend to the efforts of these types of people, so doing an ident check periodically helps to ensure that they cannot just "hang out" in the channel.


Since I use inetd, and since it is the simplest IMHO, I will start with it. You must first ensure that you have an acceptable ident client installed. Some of these include, but are not limited to in.identd, oidentd and midentd, all of which can be downloaded at http://freshmeat.net .

After you install your identd, you must enable it. This is where the differences are seen between inetd and xinetd. For inetd, you must start it from the file /etc/inetd.conf . Look through this file until you find the proper line for "auth" and uncomment it. It should look something similar to this:

/etc/inetd.conf entry
auth stream tcp nowait nobody /usr/sbin/oident oidentd -i -s -m -W -N

In the case above, you can clearly see that I have installed the oidentd server. If you choose to use oidentd, you will need to use one of the 1.x.x versions because when they went to 2.x, oidentd no longer works with xinetd.
Download oidentd-1.7.1 here

To enable your ident server using xinetd, you must create a file called /etc/xinetd.d/auth and put in that file the following lines. You can enable and disable the server by changing disable from yes to no, or vice-versa.

/etc/xinetd.d/inetd entry
service auth
{
    flags = REUSE
    socket_type = stream
    wait = no
    user = nobody
    server = /usr/sbin/oidentd
    server_args = -s -m -W -N
    log_on_failure += USERID
    disable = no
}

Finally, after all of your changes have been made, you must restart inetd or xinetd as the case may be with the command killall -HUP (x)inetd

I hope that this has been helpful to you. If you have any further questions or comments, please feel free to post them in reply to this article.

KrnlPanic

 L i n u x   W o r l d   N e w s   : : : : : : : :

What is a KrnlPanic? Well, a KrnlPanic is me! Actually, let's start with "What is a kernel?". The kernel is the core of your operating system (OS), whether your OS is Linux, Unix or windows. The kernel takes care of all process management (what program runs and when), memory management (which parts of memory get used for what) and also, the kernel takes care of interfacing the OS with your computer's hardware (disk drives, sound card, modem, network card, etc).

Now...since the kernel is doing all of these extremely important jobs, it stands to reason that if it has an error, it will be a Bad Thing(tm). If you use windows, you know a kernel panic as a "BSOD" or Blue Screen of Death. Or how about "Invalid Page Fault in KERNEL32.DLL". I'm sure you've probably seen both of those. In Linux, a Kernel Panic is normally plainly stated so. At boot time is when you will see most linux panics. I have yet to see a linux kernel panic while the system is running. You may have seen "Kernel Panic: init not found" or "Kernel Panic: VFS unable to mount root fs on 2:00". All of these previously listed errors are because of something that happened to the kernel that it couldn't handle, whether it was an access to an invalid memory location or the inability to find the initialization files it requires.

I hope that sufficiently explains things. Oh yeah...KrnlPanic is also my name ;-)

- Rick

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